“What does it profit you to give God one thing if He ask for another”?

St. John of the Cross

 

A Catholics [and therefore GODS] Hermeneutic Path to Salvation

Another I AM a Catholic Lesson

By Patrick Miron

This teaching is intended for Catholics and non-Catholics alike.

First some advice from one of the 20th Centuries most respected Theologians: Fr. John A. Hardon S.J.

“Truth is the condition of grace; it is the source of grace; it is the divinely ordained requirement of grace. Salvation God’s way requires an understanding of God’s essential Nature. “God is all good things perfected”; God therefore must be “Just and Fair”. God cannot judge you on one standard and me on another; Or condition your salvation on a different standard; a lesser expectation, that He does mine.

An understanding of the nature and the effects of our sins is also a requirement. Because Protestantism seemingly fails on both accounts they appear able to convince themselves that their “Easier Way’s” are factually being accepted by God; despite the detail that they attempt to dictate to God precisely how He will save them, while overlooking what God says he will do. Such actions are far from being a completely safe assurance to base one’s salvation on.

Mans path to salvation is by necessity, a process.

Salvation God’s way is a life-long process. [Despite claims to the contrary]. It begins with the offer of unmerited grace of Christ, which then needs to be accepted, for and in Faith, and is then further sustained by additional grace; notably Sacramental grace, which Christ Himself initiated for this very reason; that men, through him and what he makes avail to us might merit His-salvation.

As a result of Original Sin and its God imposed penalty of “Concupiscence”; [an inbred propensity towards sin]; which can, and as is ordained to be offset by Grace; especially Sacramental Grace that Christ instituted for this precise reason. Salvation is always a process that demands that we first prove by our awareness and love of God by Faith; and then because of our sins need to prove again and again, by our life-choices that we truly love God by through our humble obedience to his Commandments, precepts and mandates. Salvation for an adult can be; and very often is lost and then reclaimed through sacramental Confession, many times in our life span. And also too often lost and not regained.

Here then is a snapshot of the exclusive and essential process for humanities salvation; God’s way.

NOTE: “CCC” =’s Catechism of the Catholic Church

Baptism: CCC 1257, 1272 & Jn 3: 5, Mt 28:18-19

Faith: Once one reaches the age of reason, and progressing with age and one’s ability to comprehend truths; Faith which stems from God’s unmerited grace become essential to one’s salvation. CCC 155, 158, 1127 & Rom. 5:2, 6:14

The Natures of sin: Venial sin [less serious] 1607, 1875, & 1 John 1:5-6. Mortal sin [sin unto spiritual death] CCC 1035, 1855 – 1857 & 1 John 5:16-17. All sins have a pubic nature and accrue a God imposed punishment which must be repaid before entry into heaven is permitted. We term this: “The Temporal Punishment due to all sin” Even forgiven sins John 20:19-23, accrue Temporal Punishment

The debt of Temporal Punishment that all sin has is repaid through prayers, charitable works, and indulgences. CCC 1471-1473, 1496-1498 & Rev. 21:27, Mt. 5:26, Mt. 5:48, & Heb. 2:10. Any unpaid debt due to our venial sins, and Temporal Punishment upon one’s death; will be paid for and remitted in Purgatory, which is Biblical

Sin & its consequences: CCC 408; 814, 1488 & Heb. 6:10, Rev. 12:23, Mt. 5:26

Sacraments and Sacramental grace: CCC 1129, 20 03 & 1st. Cor. 11: 23-30, John 20:19-23

Jesus established 7 Sacraments, each of which in a manner unique to that Sacrament has a potential effect on our Salvation. The 7 Sacraments are God’s offset [Divine Justice] to His imposed Concupiscence. They are: Baptism, Confession, Eucharist, Confirmation, Marriage, Holy Orders & the Last Rites.

“Works” as a manifestation and evidence of our Faith: CCC #1821, 2186 & James Chapter. 2

The final essential step is through the frequent use of the Sacraments; and Sacramental Grace, is to die with no unconfessed, or unforgiven Mortal sins on one’s Soul. Assuming that this is accomplished in some manner other that What Christ Himself taught: CCC 1035, 1861 & 1 Jn 5: 16-17 & Jn 20:19-23

Here is a site to pull up the CCC references:

http://www.scborromeo.org/ccc.htm

Here is a site to pull up the Bible references

http://drbo.org/

If anyone is interested in receiving the FULL document; not permitted here due to space restraints. Please send me a private message and I’ll see that it is sent to you.

God Bless you,

Patrick

Below for those interested; is the same information with the actual references provided.

 

From the Council of TRENT

CHAPTER V.
On the necessity, in adults, of preparation for Justification, and whence it proceeds.

The Synod furthermore declares, that in adults, the beginning of the said Justification is to be derived from the prevenient grace of God, through Jesus Christ, that is to say, from His vocation, whereby, without any merits existing on their parts, they are called; that so they, who by sins were alienated from God, may be disposed through His quickening and assisting grace, to convert themselves to their own justification, by freely assenting to and co-operating with that said grace: in such sort that, while God touches the heart of man by the illumination of the Holy Ghost, neither is man himself utterly without doing anything while he receives that inspiration, forasmuch as he is also able to reject it; yet is he not able, by his own free will, without the grace of God, to move himself unto justice in His sight. Whence, when it is said in the sacred writings: Turn ye to me, and I will turn to you, we are admonished of our liberty; and when we answer; Convert us, O Lord, to thee, and we shall be converted, we confess that we are prevented by the grace of God.

CHAPTER VI
THE MANNER OF PREPARATION

Now, they [the adults] are disposed to that justice when, aroused and aided by divine grace, receiving faith by hearing, they are moved freely toward God, believing to be true what has been divinely revealed and promised, especially that the sinner is justified by God by his grace, through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus; and when, understanding themselves to be sinners, they, by turning themselves from the fear of divine justice, by which they are salutary aroused, to consider the mercy of God, are raised to hope, trusting that God will be propitious to them for Christ’s sake; and they begin to love Him as the fountain of all justice, and on that account are moved against sin by a certain hatred and detestation, that is, by that repentance that must be performed before baptism; finally, when they resolve to receive baptism, to begin a new life and to keep the commandments of God.

Of this disposition it is written:
He that cometh to God, must believe that he is, and is a rewarder to them that seek him; and, Be of good faith, son, thy sins are forgiven thee; and, The fear of the Lord driveth out sin; and, Do penance, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ, for the remission of your sins, and you shall receive the gift of the Holy Ghost; and, Going, therefore, teach ye all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost, teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you; finally, Prepare your hearts unto the Lord. End Trent Quotes

Baptism: CCC 1257, 1272 & John 3: 5, Mt 28:18-19

CCC # 1257 The Lord himself affirms that Baptism is necessary for salvation. He also commands his disciples to proclaim the Gospel to all nations and to baptize them. Baptism is necessary for salvation for those to whom the Gospel has been proclaimed and who have had the possibility of asking for this sacrament. The Church does not know of any means other than Baptism that assures entry into eternal beatitude; this is why she takes care not to neglect the mission she has received from the Lord to see that all who can be baptized are “reborn of water and the Spirit. “God has bound salvation to the sacrament of Baptism, but he himself is not bound by his sacraments

1272 Incorporated into Christ by Baptism, the person baptized is configured to Christ. Baptism seals the Christian with the indelible spiritual mark (character) of his belonging to Christ. No sin can erase this mark, even if sin prevents Baptism from bearing the fruits of salvation. Given once for all, Baptism cannot be repeated

John 3: 5 “Jesus answered, “Truly, truly, I say to you, unless one is born of water and the Spirit, he cannot enter the kingdom of God.”

Mt. 28: 18 “Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit”

 

Faith: Once one reaches the age of reason, and progressing with age and one’s ability to comprehend truths; Faith which stems from God’s unmerited grace become essential to one’s salvation. CCC 155, 158, 1127 & Rom. 5:2, 6:14

CCC #155 In faith, the human intellect and will cooperate with divine grace: “Believing is an act of the intellect assenting to the divine truth by command of the will moved by God through grace.

CCC # 158 “Faith seeks understanding“: it is intrinsic to faith that a believer desires to know better the One in whom he has put his faith, and to understand better what He has revealed; a more penetrating knowledge will in turn call forth a greater faith, increasingly set afire by love. The grace of faith opens “the eyes of your hearts” to a lively understanding of the contents of Revelation: that is, of the totality of God’s plan and the mysteries of faith, of their connection with each other and with Christ, the center of the revealed mystery. “The same Holy Spirit constantly perfects faith by his gifts, so that Revelation may be more and more profoundly understood.” In the words of St. Augustine, “I believe, in order to understand; and I understand, the better to believe.

CCC #1127 Celebrated worthily in faith, the sacraments confer the grace that they signify. They are efficacious because in them Christ himself is at work: it is he who baptizes, he who acts in his sacraments in order to communicate the grace that each sacrament signifies. The Father always hears the prayer of his Son’s Church which, in the epiclesis of each sacrament, expresses her faith in the power of the Spirit. As fire transforms into itself everything it touches, so the Holy Spirit transforms into the divine life whatever is subjected to his power

Rom. 5: 2 “
“Through him we have obtained access to this grace in which we stand, and we rejoice in our hope of sharing the glory of God.”

Rom. 6:14 “For sin will have no dominion over you, since you are not under law but under grace”

The Natures of sin: Venial sin [less serious] 1607, 1875, & 1 John 1:5-6. Mortal sin [sin unto spiritual death] CCC 1035, 1855 – 1857 & 1 John 5:16-17. All sins have a pubic nature and accrue a God imposed punishment which must be repaid before entry into heaven is permitted. We term this: “The Temporal Punishment due to all sin” Even forgiven sins John 20:19-23, accrue Temporal Punishment

CCC #1607 According to faith the disorder we notice so painfully does not stem from the nature of man and woman, nor from the nature of their relations, but from sin. As a break with God, the first sin had for its first consequence the rupture of the original communion between man and woman. Their relations were distorted by mutual recriminations; their mutual attraction, the Creator’s own gift, changed into a relationship of domination and lust; and the beautiful vocation of man and woman to be fruitful, multiply, and subdue the earth was burdened by the pain of childbirth and the toil of work.

CCC #1875 Venial sin constitutes a moral disorder that is reparable by charity, which it allows to subsist in us.

CCC #1855 Mortal sin destroys charity in the heart of man by a grave violation of God’s law; it turns man away from God, who is his ultimate end and his beatitude, by preferring an inferior good to him.

Venial sin allows charity to subsist, even though it offends and wounds it.

CCC #1856 Mortal sin, by attacking the vital principle within us – that is, charity – necessitates a new initiative of God’s mercy and a conversion of heart which is normally accomplished within the setting of the sacrament of reconciliation:

 

When the will sets itself upon something that is of its nature incompatible with the charity that orients man toward his ultimate end, then the sin is mortal by its very object . . . whether it contradicts the love of God, such as blasphemy or perjury, or the love of neighbor, such as homicide or adultery. . . . But when the sinner’s will is set upon something that of its nature involves a disorder, but is not opposed to the love of God and neighbor, such as thoughtless chatter or immoderate laughter and the like, such sins are venial.

 

CCC #1857 For a sin to be mortal, three conditions must together be met: “Mortal sin is sin whose object is grave matter and which is also committed with full knowledge and deliberate consent.”

CCC #1035 The teaching of the Church affirms the existence of hell and its eternity. Immediately after death the souls of those who die in a state of mortal sin descend into hell, where they suffer the punishments of hell, “eternal fire.” The chief punishment of hell is eternal separation from God, in whom alone man can possess the life and happiness for which he was created and for which he longs.

1John.1 Verses 8 to 10: “If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just, and will forgive our sins and cleanse us from all unrighteousness. If we say we have not sinned, we make him a liar, and his word is not in us.”

 

1John.5 Verses 16 to 17 “If any one sees his brother committing what is not a mortal sin, he will ask, and God will give him life for those whose sin is not mortal. There is sin which is mortal; I do not say that one is to pray for that. All wrongdoing is sin, but there is sin which is not mortal.

 

John.20 Verses 20 to 23 “When he had said this, he showed them his hands and his side. Then the disciples were glad when they saw the Lord. Jesus said to them again, “Peace be with you. As the Father has sent me, even so I send you.” And when he had said this, he breathed on them, and said to them, “Receive the Holy Spirit. If you forgive the sins of any, they are forgiven; if you retain the sins of any, they are retained

 

Matt. 18:14-18 Even so it is not the will of your Father, who is in heaven, that one of these little ones should perish. But if thy brother shall offend against thee, go, and rebuke him between thee and him alone. If he shall hear thee, thou shalt gain thy brother.

And if he will not hear thee, take with thee one or two more: that in the mouth of two or three witnesses every word may stand.  And if he will not hear them: tell the church. And if he will not hear the church, let him be to thee as the heathen and publican. Amen I say to you, whatsoever you shall bind upon earth, shall be bound also in heaven; and whatsoever you shall loose upon earth, shall be loosed also in heaven.”

 

Temporal Punishment Due to Sin

The debt of Temporal Punishment that all sin has is repaid through prayers, charitable works, and indulgences. CCC 1471-1473, 1496-1498 & Rev. 21:27, Mt. 5:26, Mt. 5:48, & Heb. 2:10. Any unpaid debt due to our venial sins, and Temporal Punishment upon one’s death; will be paid for and remitted in Purgatory, which is Biblical

CCC #1471 The doctrine and practice of indulgences in the Church are closely linked to the effects of the sacrament of Penance.

What is an indulgence?

“An indulgence is a remission before God of the temporal punishment due to sins whose guilt has already been forgiven, which the faithful Christian who is duly disposed gains under certain prescribed conditions through the action of the Church which, as the minister of redemption, dispenses and applies with authority the treasury of the satisfactions of Christ and the saints.”

“An indulgence is partial or plenary according as it removes either part or all of the temporal punishment due to sin.” The faithful can gain indulgences for themselves or apply them to the dead.

CCC #1472 To understand this doctrine and practice of the Church, it is necessary to understand that sin has a double consequence. Grave sin deprives us of communion with God and therefore makes us incapable of eternal life, the privation of which is called the “eternal punishment” of sin. On the other hand every sin, even venial, entails an unhealthy attachment to creatures, which must be purified either here on earth, or after death in the state called Purgatory. This purification frees one from what is called the “temporal punishment” of sin. These two punishments must not be conceived of as a kind of vengeance inflicted by God from without, but as following from the very nature of sin. A conversion which proceeds from a fervent charity can attain the complete purification of the sinner in such a way that no punishment would remain.

CC #1473 The forgiveness of sin and restoration of communion with God entail the remission of the eternal punishment of sin, but temporal punishment of sin remains. While patiently bearing sufferings and trials of all kinds and, when the day comes, serenely facing death, the Christian must strive to accept this temporal punishment of sin as a grace. He should strive by works of mercy and charity, as well as by prayer and the various practices of penance, to put off completely the “old man” and to put on the “new man.”

CCC #1496 The spiritual effects of the sacrament of Penance are:
– reconciliation with God by which the penitent recovers grace;
– reconciliation with the Church;
– remission of the eternal punishment incurred by mortal sins;
– remission, at least in part, of temporal punishments resulting from sin;
– peace and serenity of conscience, and spiritual consolation;
– an increase of spiritual strength for the Christian battle

CCC #1497 Individual and integral confession of grave sins followed by absolution remains the only ordinary means of reconciliation with God and with the Church

CCC #1498 Through indulgences the faithful can obtain the remission of temporal punishment resulting from sin for themselves and also for the souls in Purgatory

Purgatory:

Mt. 5: 48 “You, therefore, must be perfect, as your heavenly Father is perfect.”

Mt. 5:26 “truly, I say to you, you will never get out till you have paid the last penny”

Heb. 2:10 “For it was fitting that he, for whom and by whom all things exist, in bringing many sons to glory, should make the pioneer of their salvation perfect through suffering”

Sin & its consequences: CCC 408; 814, 1488 & Heb. 6:10, Rev. 12:23, Mt. 5:26

CCC #408 The consequences of original sin and of all men’s personal sins put the world as a whole in the sinful condition aptly described in St. John’s expression, “the sin of the world”.This expression can also refer to the negative influence exerted on people by communal situations and social structures that are the fruit of men’s sins.

CCC #814 From the beginning, this one Church has been marked by a great diversity which comes from both the variety of God’s gifts and the diversity of those who receive them. Within the unity of the People of God, a multiplicity of peoples and cultures is gathered together. Among the Church’s members, there are different gifts, offices, conditions, and ways of life. “Holding a rightful place in the communion of the Church there are also particular Churches that retain their own traditions.” The great richness of such diversity is not opposed to the Church’s unity. Yet sin and the burden of its consequences constantly threaten the gift of unity. And so the Apostle has to exhort Christians to “maintain the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace.”

CCC #1488 To the eyes of faith no evil is graver than sin and nothing has worse consequences for sinners themselves, for the Church, and for the whole world

 

Venial sin:

CCC #1416 Communion with the Body and Blood of Christ increases the communicant’s union with the Lord, forgives his venial sins, and preserves him from grave sins. Since receiving this sacrament strengthens the bonds of charity between the communicant and Christ, it also reinforces the unity of the Church as the Mystical Body of Christ.

 

CCC #1854 Sins are rightly evaluated according to their gravity. The distinction between mortal and venial sin, already evident in Scripture, became part of the tradition of the Church. It is corroborated by human experience

 

1458 Without being strictly necessary, confession of everyday faults (venial sins) is nevertheless strongly recommended by the Church. Indeed the regular confession of our venial sins helps us form our conscience, fight against evil tendencies, let ourselves be healed by Christ and progress in the life of the Spirit. By receiving more frequently through this sacrament the gift of the Father’s mercy, we are spurred to be merciful as he is merciful:

 

Whoever confesses his sins . . . is already working with God. God indicts your sins; if you also indict them, you are joined with God. Man and sinner are, so to speak, two realities: when you hear “man” – this is what God has made; when you hear “sinner” – this is what man himself has made. Destroy what you have made, so that God may save what he has made. . . . When you begin to abhor what you have made, it is then that your good works are beginning, since you are accusing yourself of your evil works. The beginning of good works is the confession of evil works. You do the truth and come to the light

 

 

Mortal Sin:

CCC #1456 Confession to a priest is an essential part of the sacrament of Penance: “All mortal sins of which penitents after a diligent self-examination are conscious must be recounted by them in confession, even if they are most secret and have been committed against the last two precepts of the Decalogue; for these sins sometimes wound the soul more grievously and are more dangerous than those which are committed openly.”

 

When Christ’s faithful strive to confess all the sins that they can remember, they undoubtedly place all of them before the divine mercy for pardon. But those who fail to do so and knowingly withhold some, place nothing before the divine goodness for remission through the mediation of the priest, “for if the sick person is too ashamed to show his wound to the doctor, the medicine cannot heal what it does not know.”

 

CCC #1457 According to the Church’s command, “after having attained the age of discretion, each of the faithful is bound by an obligation faithfully to confess serious sins at least once a year.” Anyone who is aware of having committed a mortal sin must not receive Holy Communion, even if he experiences deep contrition, without having first received sacramental absolution, unless he has a grave reason for receiving Communion and there is no possibility of going to confession. Children must go to the sacrament of Penance before receiving Holy Communion for the first time.

 

Rev. 2:23 “and I will strike her children dead. And all the churches shall know that I am he who searches mind and heart, and I will give to each of you as your works deserve

 

CCC #1855 Mortal sin destroys charity in the heart of man by a grave violation of God’s law; it turns man away from God, who is his ultimate end and his beatitude, by preferring an inferior good to him.

 

CCC #1861 Mortal sin is a radical possibility of human freedom, as is love itself. It results in the loss of charity and the privation of sanctifying grace, that is, of the state of grace. If it is not redeemed by repentance and God’s forgiveness, it causes exclusion from Christ’s kingdom and the eternal death of hell, for our freedom has the power to make choices for ever, with no turning back. However, although we can judge that an act is in itself a grave offense, we must entrust judgment of persons to the justice and mercy of God.

 

CCC #1469 This sacrament reconciles us with the Church. Sin damages or even breaks [MORTAL Sin] fraternal communion. The sacrament of Penance repairs or restores it. In this sense it does not simply heal the one restored to ecclesial communion, but has also a revitalizing effect on the life of the Church which suffered from the sin of one of her members. Re-established or strengthened in the communion of saints, the sinner is made stronger by the exchange of spiritual goods among all the living members of the Body of Christ, whether still on pilgrimage or already in the heavenly homeland:

 

Sacraments and Sacramental grace: CCC 1129, 2003 & 1st. Cor. 11: 23-30, John 20:19-23

Jesus established 7 Sacraments, each of which in a manner unique to that Sacrament has a potential effect on our Salvation. The 7 Sacraments are God’s offset [Divine Justice] to His imposed Concupiscence. They are: Baptism, Confession, Eucharist, Confirmation, Marriage, Holy Orders & the Last Rites.

CCC #1129 The Church affirms that for believers the sacraments of the New Covenant are necessary for salvation. “Sacramental grace” is the grace of the Holy Spirit, given by Christ and proper to each sacrament. The Spirit heals and transforms those who receive him by conforming them to the Son of God. The fruit of the sacramental life is that the Spirit of adoption makes the faithful partakers in the divine nature by uniting them in a living union with the only Son, the Savior.

 

CCC #2003 Grace is first and foremost the gift of the Spirit who justifies and sanctifies us. But grace also includes the gifts that the Spirit grants us to associate us with his work, to enable us to collaborate in the salvation of others and in the growth of the Body of Christ, the Church. There are sacramental graces, gifts proper to the different sacraments. There are furthermore special graces, also called charisms after the Greek term used by St. Paul and meaning “favor,” “gratuitous gift,” “benefit.” Whatever their character – sometimes it is extraordinary, such as the gift of miracles or of tongues – charisms are oriented toward sanctifying grace and are intended for the common good of the Church. They are at the service of charity which builds up the Church.

 

CCC #1129 The Church affirms that for believers the sacraments of the New Covenant are necessary for salvation. “Sacramental grace” is the grace of the Holy Spirit, given by Christ and proper to each sacrament. The Spirit heals and transforms those who receive him by conforming them to the Son of God. The fruit of the sacramental life is that the Spirit of adoption makes the faithful partakers in the divine nature by uniting them in a living union with the only Son, the Savior.

 

1st. Cor. 11:23-30For I received from the Lord what I also delivered to you, that the Lord Jesus on the night when he was betrayed took bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it, and said, “This is my body which is for you. Do this in remembrance of me.” In the same way also the cup, after supper, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in my blood. Do this, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of me.” For as often as you eat this bread and drink the cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death until he comes. Whoever, therefore, eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner will be guilty of profaning the body and blood of the Lord.
Let a man examine himself, and so eat of the bread and drink of the cup. For anyone who eats and drinks without discerning the body eats and drinks judgment upon himself. That is why many of you are weak and ill, and some have died. [“Died” here means Spiritual Death: Hell!]

John 20:19-23On the evening of that day, the first day of the week, the doors being shut where the disciples were, for fear of the Jews, Jesus came and stood among them and said to them, “Peace be with you.” When he had said this, he showed them his hands and his side. Then the disciples were glad when they saw the Lord. Jesus said to them again, “Peace be with you. As the Father has sent me, even so I send you.” And when he had said this, he breathed on them, and said to them, “Receive the Holy Spirit. If you forgive the sins of any, they are forgiven; if you retain the sins of any, they are retained.”

“Articular Confession” [priest & penetrant directly: “person to person”] is and remains God’s specified manner for the forgiveness of man’s sin.”

“Works” as the necessary manifestation and evidence of our Faith: CCC #1821, 2186 & James Chapter. 2

After Peter denied our Blessed Lord three times; [Mt. 26:34, 75] Jesus forgave him, BUT also insisted on evidence of Peters regret, Peters sorrow for his sin.

John 21: 15-17 “When they had finished breakfast, Jesus said to Simon Peter, “Simon, son of John, do you love me more than these?” He said to him, “Yes, Lord; you know that I love you.” He said to him, “Feed my lambs.  ”A second time he said to him, “Simon, son of John, do you love me?” He said to him, “Yes, Lord; you know that I love you.” He said to him, “Tend my sheep.  “He said to him the third time, “Simon, son of John, do you love me?” Peter was grieved because he said to him the third time, “Do you love me?” And he said to him, “Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you.” Jesus said to him, “Feed my sheep.”

In exactly that same manner, and for exactly that same reason [SIN], Jesus ask us: Do You love me? And it is precisely this question that in an absolute manner requires evidence of our love of God; evidence that is manifested; evidence that is made clear in our actions and life choices, through Charity.

James 2:12-26 “So speak and so act as those who are to be judged under the law of liberty. For judgment is without mercy to one who has shown no mercy; yet mercy triumphs over judgment. What does it profit, my brethren, if a man says he has faith but has not works? Can his faith save him?  If a brother or sister is ill-clad and in lack of daily food, and one of you says to them, “Go in peace, be warmed and filled,” without giving them the things needed for the body, what does it profit? So faith by itself, if it has no works, is dead. But someone will say, “You have faith and I have works.” Show me your faith apart from your works, and I by my works will show you my faith. You believe that God is one; you do well. Even the demons believe — and shudder. Do you want to be shown, you shallow man, that faith apart from works is barren? Was not Abraham our father justified by works, when he offered his son Isaac upon the altar? You see that faith was active along with his works, and faith was completed by works, and the scripture was fulfilled which says, “Abraham believed God, and it was reckoned to him as righteousness”; and he was called the friend of God. You see that a man is justified by works and not by faith alone.  For as the body apart from the spirit is dead, so faith apart from works is dead.”

CCC #1821 We can therefore hope in the glory of heaven promised by God to those who love him and do his will. In every circumstance, each one of us should hope, with the grace of God, to persevere “to the end” and to obtain the joy of heaven, as God’s eternal reward for the good works accomplished with the grace of Christ. In hope, the Church prays for “all men to be saved.” She longs to be united with Christ, her Bridegroom, in the glory of heaven:

 

Hope, O my soul, hope. You know neither the day nor the hour. Watch carefully, for everything passes quickly, even though your impatience makes doubtful what is certain, and turns a very short time into a long one. Dream that the more you struggle, the more you prove the love that you bear your God, and the more you will rejoice one day with your Beloved, in a happiness and rapture that can never end.

CCC #2186 Those Christians who have leisure should be mindful of their brethren who have the same needs and the same rights, yet cannot rest from work because of poverty and misery. Sunday is traditionally consecrated by Christian piety to good works and humble service of the sick, the infirm, and the elderly. Christians will also sanctify Sunday by devoting time and care to their families and relatives, often difficult to do on other days of the week. Sunday is a time for reflection, silence, cultivation of the mind, and meditation which furthers the growth of the Christian interior life.

CCC #1477 “This treasury includes as well the prayers and good works of the Blessed Virgin Mary. They are truly immense, unfathomable, and even pristine in their value before God. In the treasury, too, are the prayers and good works of all the saints, all those who have followed in the footsteps of Christ the Lord and by his grace have made their lives holy and carried out the mission the Father entrusted to them. In this way they attained their own salvation and at the same time cooperated in saving their brothers in the unity of the Mystical Body.”

CCC #2008 The merit of man before God in the Christian life arises from the fact that God has freely chosen to associate man with the work of his grace. The fatherly action of God is first on his own initiative, and then follows man’s free acting through his collaboration, so that the merit of good works is to be attributed in the first place to the grace of God, then to the faithful. Man’s merit, moreover, itself is due to God, for his good actions proceed in Christ, from the predispositions and assistance given by the Holy Spirit.

The Final essential Step

The final essential step is through the frequent use of the Sacraments; and Sacramental Grace, is to die with no unconfessed, or unforgiven Mortal sins on one’s Soul.

Intentionally or not, choosing to obey mere men; men who founded religions intended to oppose God’s already firmly established Faith; [no other conclusion is possible], while easier and more appealing, is at best risking one’s Soul and one’s salvation. Acts 5:29 “But Peter and the apostles answered, “We must obey God rather than men.”

Assuming that this is accomplished in some manner other that What Christ Himself taught: CCC 1035, 1861 & 1 Jn 5: 16-17 & Jn 20:19-23; is a very risky belief. Man is not to try God’s Patience; man is not to dictate to God; how exactly he God, will save him. No faith is learned by what is heard. And only the Catholic Church can and does have the authority of Christ Himself [John 17: 16-19] to share the fullness of Christ own Faith Beliefs. Amen!

CCC #1035 The teaching of the Church affirms the existence of hell and its eternity. Immediately after death the souls of those who die in a state of mortal sin descend into hell, where they suffer the punishments of hell, “eternal fire.” The chief punishment of hell is eternal separation from God, in whom alone man can possess the life and happiness for which he was created and for which he longs.

 

CCC #1861 Mortal sin is a radical possibility of human freedom, as is love itself. It results in the loss of charity and the privation of sanctifying grace, that is, of the state of grace. If it is not redeemed by repentance and God’s forgiveness, it causes exclusion from Christ’s kingdom and the eternal death of hell, for our freedom has the power to make choices for ever, with no turning back. However, although we can judge that an act is in itself a grave offense, we must entrust judgment of persons to the justice and mercy of God

 

1 John 5: 16-17 “If any one sees his brother committing what is not a mortal sin, he will ask, and God will give him life for those whose sin is not mortal. There is sin which is mortal; I do not say that one is to pray for that. All wrongdoing is sin, but there is sin which is not mortal”

 

John  20:19-23 “On the evening of that day, the first day of the week, the doors being shut where the disciples were, for fear of the Jews, Jesus came and stood among them and said to them, “Peace be with you.” When he had said this, he showed them his hands and his side. Then the disciples were glad when they saw the Lord. Jesus said to them again, “Peace be with you. As the Father has sent me, even so I send you.” And when he had said this, he breathed on them, and said to them, “Receive the Holy Spirit. If YOU forgive the sins of any, they are forgiven; if YOU retain the sins of any, they are retained.” And yes, the King James says the same thing.

Isaiah 15: 17

“Before a man are life and death, and whichever he chooses will be given to him.”

 

God Bless you,

Patrick

 

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