POLL ON COVID 

POLL ON COVID  Americans are increasingly becoming more comfortable in public spaces and traveling, according to a recent poll by Civic Science. The survey found that 35% of adult Americans are “not at all concerned” with being in public spaces, while 43% are still “somewhat concerned” and 22% are still “very concerned.” Additionally, 55% of Americans felt comfortable going out to eat now and 39% said they felt comfortable enough to go on vacation.

Biden Admin Working On Vaccine Passports That ‘Could Display A Scannable Code Similar To An Airline Boarding Pass’ (It’s mostly about CONTROL)

Biden Admin Working On Vaccine Passports That ‘Could Display A Scannable Code Similar To An Airline Boarding Pass’: Report

By Ryan Saavedra•Mar 28, 2021 DailyWire.com•FacebookTwitterMail

US President Joe Biden waves before boarding Air Force One after spending the weekend in Wilmington, at New Castle airport in New Castle, Delaware on March 28, 2021.OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty ImagesThe Biden administration is reportedly working on developing coronavirus vaccine passports that would allow Americans to prove that they have been vaccinated since some businesses have indicated that they will require proof of vaccination for people to enter their businesses.“The administration’s initiative has been driven largely by arms of the Department of Health and Human Services, including an office devoted to health information technology, said five officials who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss the effort,” The Washington Post reported. “The White House this month took on a bigger role coordinating government agencies involved in the work, led by coronavirus coordinator Jeff Zients, with a goal of announcing updates in coming days.”

Candace OwensThe report said that a digital version of the vaccine passport would be available through smartphone apps and “could display a scannable code similar to an airline boarding pass.” Developers told the Post that people should also have the option of printing out a vaccine passport. The vaccine passports are expected to face “significant hurdles” surrounding data privacy and making sure that the passports cannot be counterfeited.“One of the most significant hurdles facing federal officials: the sheer number of passport initiatives underway, with the Biden administration this month identifying at least 17,” the Post added. “Those initiatives — such as a World Health Organization-led global effort and a digital pass devised by IBM that is being tested in New York state — are rapidly moving forward, even as the White House deliberates about how best to track the shots and avoid the perception of a government mandate to be vaccinated.”

An official told the Post that developers are working on ways to include how to use the apps to “adjust for the spread of variants” and monitoring “how booster shots would be tracked.”to the coronavirus.“

The Electronic Frontier Foundation, a digital rights group, argues that using smartphone-based verification to access public places would create a two-tiered system that bars people who can’t work, shop or attend school because they don’t have a cell phone or access to testing,” Politico reported. “There also are privacy considerations. Requiring people to store test and vaccination results in digital format could expose them to the kind of data breaches that have proliferated during the pandemic.”

Politico’s report also noted that several legislatures have introduced bills to “prevent discrimination for people with religious objections or health conditions that might prevent them from getting immunized.

”New York is unveiling the nation’s first vaccine passport, dubbed the “Excelsior Pass,” which is a smartphone app that will allow people to either print out a passport or store it in their phones.“Each Pass will have a secure QR code, which participating businesses and venues can scan using a companion app to verify proof of COVID-19 negative test results or proof of vaccination,” a news release said. “An individual’s data is kept secure and confidential at all times.”

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Cardinal Sarah asks Pope Francis to reinstate individual Masses at St. Peter’s Basilica

By Hannah Brockhaus for CNA

March 29, 2021 Catholic News Agency The Dispatch 0Print

Cardinal Robert Sarah offers Mass in St. Peter’s Basilica for his 50th anniversary of priesthood in 2019. (Credit: Evandro Inetti/CNA)

Vatican City, Mar 29, 2021 / 08:28 am (CNA).- Cardinal Robert Sarah has asked Pope Francis to reinstate the celebration of private Masses at the side altars in St. Peter’s Basilica, after individual Masses were suspended earlier this month in favor of concelebration.

“I humbly beg the Holy Father to order the withdrawal of the recent norms issued by the secretariat of state,” Cardinal Sarah wrote in an essay published Monday on the blog of Vatican journalist Sandro Magister.

The cardinal said the new norms “are as lacking in justice as in love, do not correspond to the truth or the law, do not facilitate but rather endanger the decorum of the celebration, devout participation in the Mass, and the freedom of the children of God.”

Sarah, prefect emeritus of the Vatican’s Congregation for Divine Worship, joins Cardinals Raymond Burke, Gerhard Muller, and Walter Brandmuller, in publically voicing disagreement with the ban on individual Masses, which went into effect March 22.

The new protocols, which were decreed by the First Section of the Secretariat of State, said priests will be invited to take part in several concelebrated Masses at St. Peter’s every day, but will not be permitted to offer private Masses at the basilica’s many side altars.

It was a long-standing custom in the basilica that priests would offer individual Masses in the early morning hours at some of the side altars in the basilica. Sometimes priests said the Mass alone or with only a deacon, and other times they would be accompanied by small groups of Catholics.

Priests traveling with pilgrim groups were also permitted to reserve an altar for a private Mass.

There are a total of 45 altars and 11 chapels in St. Peter’s Basilica.

In his essay, Cardinal Sarah asked if it was necessary to break this “ancient and venerable custom,” writing, “does such a decision really produce greater good for the Church and greater decorum in the liturgy?”

The cardinal said “the main, not to say the only, role of an altar is in fact that the Eucharistic sacrifice be offered on it.”

“The presence of the relics of the saints under the altars has a biblical, theological, liturgical, and spiritual value of such magnitude that there is no need even to mention them,” he added. “With the new norms the altars of St. Peter’s are destined to serve, except one day a year, only as tombs of saints, if not as mere works of art. Those altars, instead, must live, and their life is the daily celebration of the Holy Mass.”

Sarah also recalled that, over the centuries, there have been many saints who offered Mass at St. Peter’s Basilica when they were in Rome.

He questioned why this experience is now being denied to “the saints of today — who thank God exist, are among us, and visit Rome at least from time to time.”

Cardinal Sarah referenced canon 902 of the Code of Canon Law, which refers to “Sacrosanctum concilium” no. 57, and “guarantees priests the possibility of personally celebrating the Eucharist.”

He also noted that there are priests who come to Rome and do not speak Italian, and who would therefore find it difficult to concelebrate one of the official Masses at St. Peter’s Basilica, as the new norms dictate.

The cardinal quoted the decree “Presbyterorum ordinis,” from the Second Vatican Council, which says: “In the mystery of the Eucharistic Sacrifice, in which priests fulfill their greatest task, the work of our redemption is being constantly carried on; and hence the daily celebration of Mass is strongly urged, since even if there cannot be present a number of the faithful, it is still an act of Christ and of the Church.”

“Not only is it confirmed here that, even when the priest celebrates without the people, the Mass remains an act of Christ and of the Church, but its daily celebration is also recommended,” Sarah commented.

“When possible, community celebration is preferred, but individual celebration by a priest remains the work of Christ and the Church. The magisterium not only does not prohibit it, but approves it, and recommends that priests celebrate Holy Mass every day, because from every Mass there flows a great quantity of graces for the whole world,” he said.

Pope Francis accepted Cardinal Sarah’s resignation as prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments on Feb. 20, after Sarah turned 75 in June 2020

Seeing the light of Christ in the darkness of COVID

Fr. Ivan Millico’s Seeing the Pandemic with Eyes of Faith: Seven Prophets for Our Time offers an incisive assessment of the damage COVID has wrought and helps readers to see both the crisis and its solution with eyes of faith.

March 28, 2021 Fr. Charles Fox The Dispatch 1Print

A crucifix is pictured inside a Catholic church in Madrid March 7, 2020, during the COVID-19 pandemic.(CNS photo/Susana Vera, Reuters)
“No one believes anything without first perceiving that it ought to be believed,” St. Augustine once wrote. The intellect and the will, prompted by grace and impelled by love, allow a person both to perceive the truths of the Catholic Faith and to profess his own belief in those truths.

The act of faith in these truths, and especially in the Truth, the Lord Jesus Christ, enables a deeper and more comprehensive perception of reality. To see the world with the “eyes of faith” is to see things as they truly are. A person of faith perceives, at the heart of all things, the love of God, Who gave His only-begotten Son for our salvation.

“Light shines in the darkness,” St. John tells us in the Prologue of his Gospel. “And the darkness has not overcome it.” The light of Christ shines in the darkness of this fallen world, but only those who believe in Him escape the darkness and live in His light.

The darkness of the world has seemed especially thick since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. Virtually every person on the planet has suffered in one way or another over this past year because of COVID.

In his recent book, Seeing the Pandemic with Eyes of Faith: Seven Prophets for Our Time, Fr. Ivano Millico strives to shed the light of Christ into precisely this pandemic-induced darkness.

In his brief, incisive text, Millico offers an assessment of the damage COVID has wrought and helps his readers to see both the crisis and its solution with eyes of faith.

When intense suffering and darkness come, as they have come over this past year, a person’s head and heart must both turn to the Lord in one act of belief.

In the words, “I believe,” the whole person is implicated. When a person suffers, the whole person is tested, including his faith. The faith of many has been tested during a pandemic that in its most intense period brought much of life as we knew it to a standstill and throughout the year has impaired almost every social dimension of our lives. The crisis posed by the COVID-19 pandemic has challenged the physical, psychological, and spiritual health of Catholics in ways many of us had not previously experienced.

One extremely effective way to shine the light of Christ such a crisis is to set before people the “lamps” of the saints. Father Millico offers seven such lamps, each of whose Christ-lights were kindled by his or her own suffering.

A person’s devotion to the saints says a great deal about the strength and quality of his faith. The lives of the most outstanding and holy members of the Mystical Body of Christ provide a kind of living Gospel for those of us who are still striving to respond wholeheartedly to the Universal Call to Holiness.

Our striving has become especially challenging over the past year, and Millico treats the COVID crisis with pastoral concern and gravity, but without overestimating the power of COVID over the human soul. Millico follows Pope Francis in pointing out that the pandemic, like any crisis, poses both an opportunity and a threat.

“The pandemic has put all of us in a crisis,” Millico quotes Pope Francis as saying, in his chapter on St. Ignatius of Loyola. “But let us remember…after a crisis a person does not come out the same. We either come out of it better or we come out of it worse.”

The Catholic Truth Society, which publishes Millico’s book, has as its motto, “Truth, beautifully told.” Seeing the Pandemic with the Eyes of Faith fulfills these words, offering the stories of seven models of gracious and faith-filled suffering. The stories of each of these “prophets for our time” is told with vividness and efficiency. Millico recounts the details of their lives that relate to the topic at-hand, drawing lessons from them that are truly helpful and easily applied in the lives of those suffering through this strange and difficult time.

The figures Millico presents are St. Thérèse of Lisieux, St. Charles Borromeo, the nineteenth-century Parisian spiritual guide Abbé Henri Marie-Joseph Huvelin, St. Ignatius of Loyola, St. John Henry Newman, and Job. Each life illustrates in a different but complementary way the transformative difference faith makes in the experience of suffering.

In St. Thérèse, we see what it is to endure sickness and grow in charity. Saint Charles teaches us how to serve with self-sacrificial love during a time of plague. Abbé Huvelin’s ministry illustrates the potential to do tremendous good in the lives of others, even under the most difficult personal circumstances. Saint Ignatius of Loyola serves as a model of crisis-induced conversion. The blending of external misfortune and internal suffering is on display in the life of St. John Henry Newman, who bore his trials with patient abandonment to God’s will, and came out of these experiences a new man in Christ. And Job, whose very name is proverbially associated with patience, also offers a model of conversion from one form of “fear of the Lord” to a deeper, truer living of this virtue.

Millico’s most helpful contribution is that he gives to the sufferings of these prophets their due weight and only then tells the story of how by God’s grace they grew and even flourished. Too many spiritual works rush to the victories of the saints. Millico in no way hides these victories. He makes it clear what he is about throughout the text. But he demonstrates a gift for making it clear that even the saints are real people who experience profound and awful suffering.

It is because he allows his readers to feel the weight of these sufferings that Millico is able to shine the light of their victories all-the-more brightly on the current pandemic and the challenges it has brought into our lives. We can easily relate to the intense difficulties these men and women faced, finding hope in the graces given to them and offered to us.

Of Abbé Huvelin, Millico writes that “his sufferings made the man.” Read with the eyes of faith, the stories of the saints inspire true hope that suffering is a path to glory. Whatever the COVID-19 pandemic brings our way, the words of St. Charles Borromeo point us to what is at the very heart of Millico’s witness. Writing a remembrance of the plague that ravaged Milan from 1576-78, St. Charles offered his beloved people these words:

There is one thing, my children, of which we must make mention, which will make us appreciate more fully the magnitude of the mercies we have received at the hand of God. Have always before you this great benefit which God has so miraculously worked for you, and never be at any time unmindful of his mercy.

During our current crisis, many people are struggling to find meaning in their suffering or the suffering of their loved ones. Such people are sure to profit from reading Fr. Millico’s brief but powerful book on these seven saintly models of faith, cooperation with God’s grace, and trust in His loving plan for each and all of us.

Seeing the Pandemic with Eyes of Faith: Seven Prophets for Our Time
by Fr. Ivan Millico
Catholic Truth Society, 2021
Softcover, 84 page

Seeing the light of Christ in the darkness of COVID

Fr. Ivan Millico’s Seeing the Pandemic with Eyes of Faith: Seven Prophets for Our Time offers an incisive assessment of the damage COVID has wrought and helps readers to see both the crisis and its solution with eyes of faith.

March 28, 2021 Fr. Charles Fox The Dispatch 1Print

A crucifix is pictured inside a Catholic church in Madrid March 7, 2020, during the COVID-19 pandemic.(CNS photo/Susana Vera, Reuters)

“No one believes anything without first perceiving that it ought to be believed,” St. Augustine once wrote. The intellect and the will, prompted by grace and impelled by love, allow a person both to perceive the truths of the Catholic Faith and to profess his own belief in those truths.

The act of faith in these truths, and especially in the Truth, the Lord Jesus Christ, enables a deeper and more comprehensive perception of reality. To see the world with the “eyes of faith” is to see things as they truly are. A person of faith perceives, at the heart of all things, the love of God, Who gave His only-begotten Son for our salvation.

“Light shines in the darkness,” St. John tells us in the Prologue of his Gospel. “And the darkness has not overcome it.” The light of Christ shines in the darkness of this fallen world, but only those who believe in Him escape the darkness and live in His light.

The darkness of the world has seemed especially thick since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. Virtually every person on the planet has suffered in one way or another over this past year because of COVID.

In his recent book, Seeing the Pandemic with Eyes of Faith: Seven Prophets for Our Time, Fr. Ivano Millico strives to shed the light of Christ into precisely this pandemic-induced darkness.

In his brief, incisive text, Millico offers an assessment of the damage COVID has wrought and helps his readers to see both the crisis and its solution with eyes of faith.

When intense suffering and darkness come, as they have come over this past year, a person’s head and heart must both turn to the Lord in one act of belief.

In the words, “I believe,” the whole person is implicated. When a person suffers, the whole person is tested, including his faith. The faith of many has been tested during a pandemic that in its most intense period brought much of life as we knew it to a standstill and throughout the year has impaired almost every social dimension of our lives. The crisis posed by the COVID-19 pandemic has challenged the physical, psychological, and spiritual health of Catholics in ways many of us had not previously experienced.

One extremely effective way to shine the light of Christ such a crisis is to set before people the “lamps” of the saints. Father Millico offers seven such lamps, each of whose Christ-lights were kindled by his or her own suffering.

A person’s devotion to the saints says a great deal about the strength and quality of his faith. The lives of the most outstanding and holy members of the Mystical Body of Christ provide a kind of living Gospel for those of us who are still striving to respond wholeheartedly to the Universal Call to Holiness.

Our striving has become especially challenging over the past year, and Millico treats the COVID crisis with pastoral concern and gravity, but without overestimating the power of COVID over the human soul. Millico follows Pope Francis in pointing out that the pandemic, like any crisis, poses both an opportunity and a threat.

“The pandemic has put all of us in a crisis,” Millico quotes Pope Francis as saying, in his chapter on St. Ignatius of Loyola. “But let us remember…after a crisis a person does not come out the same. We either come out of it better or we come out of it worse.”

The Catholic Truth Society, which publishes Millico’s book, has as its motto, “Truth, beautifully told.” Seeing the Pandemic with the Eyes of Faith fulfills these words, offering the stories of seven models of gracious and faith-filled suffering. The stories of each of these “prophets for our time” is told with vividness and efficiency. Millico recounts the details of their lives that relate to the topic at-hand, drawing lessons from them that are truly helpful and easily applied in the lives of those suffering through this strange and difficult time.

The figures Millico presents are St. Thérèse of Lisieux, St. Charles Borromeo, the nineteenth-century Parisian spiritual guide Abbé Henri Marie-Joseph Huvelin, St. Ignatius of Loyola, St. John Henry Newman, and Job. Each life illustrates in a different but complementary way the transformative difference faith makes in the experience of suffering.

In St. Thérèse, we see what it is to endure sickness and grow in charity. Saint Charles teaches us how to serve with self-sacrificial love during a time of plague. Abbé Huvelin’s ministry illustrates the potential to do tremendous good in the lives of others, even under the most difficult personal circumstances. Saint Ignatius of Loyola serves as a model of crisis-induced conversion. The blending of external misfortune and internal suffering is on display in the life of St. John Henry Newman, who bore his trials with patient abandonment to God’s will, and came out of these experiences a new man in Christ. And Job, whose very name is proverbially associated with patience, also offers a model of conversion from one form of “fear of the Lord” to a deeper, truer living of this virtue.

Millico’s most helpful contribution is that he gives to the sufferings of these prophets their due weight and only then tells the story of how by God’s grace they grew and even flourished. Too many spiritual works rush to the victories of the saints. Millico in no way hides these victories. He makes it clear what he is about throughout the text. But he demonstrates a gift for making it clear that even the saints are real people who experience profound and awful suffering.

It is because he allows his readers to feel the weight of these sufferings that Millico is able to shine the light of their victories all-the-more brightly on the current pandemic and the challenges it has brought into our lives. We can easily relate to the intense difficulties these men and women faced, finding hope in the graces given to them and offered to us.

Of Abbé Huvelin, Millico writes that “his sufferings made the man.” Read with the eyes of faith, the stories of the saints inspire true hope that suffering is a path to glory. Whatever the COVID-19 pandemic brings our way, the words of St. Charles Borromeo point us to what is at the very heart of Millico’s witness. Writing a remembrance of the plague that ravaged Milan from 1576-78, St. Charles offered his beloved people these words:

There is one thing, my children, of which we must make mention, which will make us appreciate more fully the magnitude of the mercies we have received at the hand of God. Have always before you this great benefit which God has so miraculously worked for you, and never be at any time unmindful of his mercy.

During our current crisis, many people are struggling to find meaning in their suffering or the suffering of their loved ones. Such people are sure to profit from reading Fr. Millico’s brief but powerful book on these seven saintly models of faith, cooperation with God’s grace, and trust in His loving plan for each and all of us.

Seeing the Pandemic with Eyes of Faith: Seven Prophets for Our Timeby Fr. Ivan Millico
Catholic Truth Society, 2021
Softcover, 84 pages

Does the Church No Longer Defend the Deposit of Faith?

REGIS MARTIN

Bishop Kohlgraf

When I first heard the story of a silly nun who’d gotten herself ordained as a Protestant priestess while teaching theology at a major Catholic University, I was not surprised. Nor was I surprised to learn of the subsequent lawsuit she filed to prevent her being fired. What did surprise me, however, was the fact that it was thrown out, thus enabling the institution to go ahead with her dismissal.

The good guys do sometimes win. But in a sane world, why should anyone be surprised when, boundaries of permissible belief and behavior having been set, those who violate them get canned? Because we live in strange times, that’s why. Times in which faithlessness, not fidelity, gets rewarded.

Leaving aside the nonsense of this or that chuckleheaded nun, what remains essential to the maintenance of the Catholic Thing, without which there can be no coherent expression of faith, is the existence of an institutional structure divinely designed to uphold the fullness and integrity of that faith. “Intrinsic to the basic structure of the act of faith,” writes Joseph Ratzinger in Principles of Catholic Theology, “is incorporation into the Church, the common situs of that which binds together and that which is bound.” Then, referencing Romans 6:17, he reminds us that “this act of faith is defined as the process by which an individual submits himself to one particular creed and, in doing so, performs an act of obedience that comes from the heart, that is, from the center of his whole being.”

“Guard the noble deposit,” exhorts the Apostle Paul to Timothy, his young colleague and friend, in what was perhaps his final epistle. And why should he do that? Because, very simply, it is the mission entrusted to the Church by our Blessed Lord. It is not anything we have discovered on our own, pursuant to this or that swashbuckling endeavor. Rather, it is something that we have been given, a pearl beyond price, and thus a thing we should be loath to lose. As the inimitable Belloc once put it: “The moral is, it is indeed, thou shalt not monkey with the creed!”    

Faith is not philosophy, in other words. It is not something on which we reflect, but rather Someone we receive, and upon whom we are blessedly free to repose the whole weight of our understanding and trust. “It is not a matter of learning and cleverness,” Hans Urs von Balthasar advises, “but the courage to put oneself at risk.

As did Pope St. John Paul II, by the way, when asked why he would not allow the ordination of women. “I am not authorized to do so,” he said in effect. Not, heaven knows, because he despised women, or felt they were somehow inferior to men, whose bastions of medieval privilege he was determined to preserve. But because he and the Church, whose teachings it is the job of popes and bishops always and everywhere to defend, must remain on the side of Christ.

Christ willed these structures in the first instance, and thus they are irreformable. Just as you or I may not blithely set aside the whole constitution of being, the order of creation itself, in order to sanction same-sex marriage or, to cite the current grotesquerie, the castration of boys so that they may compete against girls on athletic fields.

Or, come to think of it, certain rogue bishops in Germany, who have lately become infatuated with the idea of Church blessings for homosexual unions. They appear to be in a great hurry to enact sweeping changes in the Catechism of the Catholic Church in order to accommodate what used to be called sodomy. The bishop of Mainz, for example; one of several spearheading the effort. ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW

His fixation on the subject has driven him to the extremity of whitewashing practices that, until the day before yesterday, were classified as mortal sins. “As to the demand for chastity,” he asks “what does it mean from the perspective of people who experience same-sex attraction? I think that few of them would consider this demand as tactful and respectful because,” as he patronizingly continues, “this inclination is not self-selected.”

Is he kidding? What has “self-selection” got to do with it? Has he never heard of concupiscence? Or ever experienced the least tug of appetite for pleasures which, in the light of reason and with an aim toward greater self-mastery, demand that he say no to? Or is it only heterosexual temptation that needs to be resisted? Why should only married couples feel the need to exercise chastity when enticement comes around? Is moral heroism a vocation only for “straight” people to pursue? How insulting it is to exempt whole categories of human beings from having to travel the high road of holiness and sexual purity!

If great big bishops will not guard the noble deposit, then it may be time to depose them.ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW

[Photo Credit: Bishop Peter Kohlgraf of Mainz (Wikimedia Regis Martin

By Regis Martin

Regis Martin is Professor of Theology and Faculty Associate with the Veritas Center for Ethics in Public Life at the Franciscan University of Steubenville. He earned a licentiate and a doctorate in sacred theology from the Pontifical University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Rome. Martin is the author of a number of books, including Still Point: Loss, Longing, and Our Search for God (2012) and The Beggar’s Banquet (Emmaus Road). His most recent book, also published by Emmaus Road, is called Witness to Wonder: The World of Catholic Sacrament. He resides in Steubenville, Ohio, with his wife and ten children.

Democrats link filibuster, federal voting bill in the shadow of Georgia’s new election law

Democrats on Sunday seized on Georgia’s new election laws to push their federal voting rights legislation and an end to the Senate filibuster moves that Republicans denounced as naked power grabs.

Read More >

Democrats link filibuster, federal voting bill in the shadow of Georgia’s new election law

Democrats on Sunday seized on Georgia’s new election laws to push their federal voting rights legislation and an end to the Senate filibuster moves that Republicans denounced as naked power grabs.

Read More >

Biden plans to appoint Manchin’s wife to $160K post” (Can anyone say BRIBERY for Den swing votes)

The White House announced on Friday it would nominate Gayle Conelly Manchin, a former president of West Virginia’s State Board of Education, to serve as federal co-chair of the Appalachian Regional Commission.

Read More >

Biden plans to appoint Manchin’s wife to $160K post

The White House announced on Friday it would nominate Gayle Conelly Manchin, a former president of West Virginia’s State Board of Education, to serve as federal co-chair of the Appalachian Regional Commission.

Read More >

Reflection 87: The Will of God in All Things

Reflection 87: The Will of God in All Things
Video

Wouldn’t it be nice if you could do the Will of God always?  If you could simply make the choice to perfectly say “Yes” to God in all things and in every situation?  The truth is that you can.  The only thing hindering you from this absolute choice is your own stubborn will (See Diary #374).

It’s hard to admit that we are stubborn and full of self-will.  It’s hard to let go of our own will and to choose, instead, the Will of God in all things.  Hard though it may be, we must make this our firm resolve.  And when we fail, we must resolve again.  Never tire of trying again and again.  Your unfailing effort brings joy to the Heart of our Lord.

Lord, I do desire to embrace Your Divine Will in all things.  Help me to be free of my own selfish will and to choose only You in all things.  I abandon myself into Your hands.  When I fall, help me to get back up rather than to give into discouragement.  Jesus, I trust in You.

40 Days at the Foot of the Cross – Reflection Thirty-Eight – The Soldier’s Lance